Saving Eggshells – Saving My Sanity

It is BEAUTIFUL!

While looking outside this morning at the beautiful snowscape this winter has delivered, my eyes could not help but glance at my garden. My garden is never far from my mind anytime of the year. There it lay covered in 2 ½  feet of snow. The chickens who get to enjoy it as their winter playground are huddled in the chicken coop. I dream of spring, fingers entrenched in the soil of the earth – STOP!! I must not go there. I must not get Spring Fever yet. I know it will come as it does every year but there is still a lot of winter in our forecast. What to do – SAVE EGGSHELLS!! Yep, you heard me right.

Garden covered in snow.

What Has Been Tried

I have tried various different ideas for seedling starting pots but the ones I like using best are eggshells. I will admit the ones that didn’t work are likely due to operator error more than anything else.  I have tried egg cartons. I found the cartons didn’t hold their form until transplanting time. I was able to make quite a mess out of them. Then I tried small paper cups. Those worked better for me. They held their shape and it was easy to peel the paper away from the start at transplant time. There is still the cost of the cups and then the disposal of the cups after transplanting. After that I tried making my own pots out of newspaper and a small tin can. This was a fun project and held my Spring Fever at bay during the winter while I made literally dozens of newspaper cups. They held their shape until transplant. I cut the paper away from the soil when transplanting since I didn’t want the newspaper in the soil. There was still the disposal of the newspaper after transplant but the cost was low.

Then, years ago I came across a clever person’s blog on the internet about using eggshells for starting seedlings. WOW! What a great idea! We have chickens, a family of five eats plenty of eggs. The eggshells hold their shape and an added bonus is that the eggshells act as compost in the soil and there is nothing to dispose of after transplant. Love this idea! I wish I could remember who it was so I could give you the link and give them a big hug. This has truly changed the way I start my transplant seeds and keeps my Spring Fever at bay, which in turn makes me happy, which in turn makes my family happy, which in turn has changed our life. Okay, maybe not that dramatic, but I think this is a very clever idea.

 

So here is how I save eggshells, keep my Spring Fever at bay and stay sane when the snow is piling up and it will be months before I can get into the garden.

The Process

 

Using a pushpin poke a small hole in the large end of the egg. This will act as a drain hole.

 

 

 

Very carefully crack the egg about ¼ of the way down from the top of the small end.

 

 

The top of the eggshell goes into the compost bucket for the chickens.

 

 

 

The bottom of the eggshell is washed out and placed in an egg carton until it’s time to plant.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My dear husband even saves eggshells for me – Lord bless him – he knows how closely my sanity is attached to these eggshells this time of year.

 

 

 

The eggshells store nicely in egg cartons on a shelf. I can collect all winter!

Happy, happy am I!!!

 

 

 

Sow Seeds of Love!

Charlene

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